Advertising and Marketing

This blog has been cross-posted on Seyfarth’s California Peculiarities Employment Law blog.

Seyfarth Synopsis: Collaborations with athletes, actors, and singers have always been a great way for companies to grow their brand recognition and create profitable products. Similar to celebrity-filled ads in the Super Bowl, collaborative relationships between influencers and companies on social media

Seyfarth attorneys Aaron Belzer, Lauren Leipold, Ken Wilton, and Renée Appel will present at the Association of National Advertisers’ Legal Affairs Committee meeting on Thursday, October 19, 2023.

The team will present on the following topics:

  • Updates in false advertising litigation, including, consumer class actions, Lanham Act litigation, and cases at the National Advertising Division

The U.S. Supreme Court has unanimously rejected the Ninth Circuit’s opinion that a poop-themed dog toy should be protected as parody under the First Amendment. SCOTUS ruled today in Jack Daniel’s Properties Inc. v. VIP Products, Inc. that the right to free expression does not excuse “trademark law’s cardinal sin”—use of another’s trademark “as a

On Tuesday, June 13 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern, Seyfarth attorneys Kristine Argentine, John Tomaszewski, and Paul Yovanic will present at the Association of National Advertisers webinar,  “Emerging Issues Surrounding Privacy Class Actions and Compliance in 2023.”

The webinar will address the recent surge in consumer class actions, compliance considerations, and recent developments

This post was originally published on Seyfarth’s The Blunt Truth blog.

Federal bans, lack of knowledge, and misinformation all stifle IP protection in the cannabis industry. Previously, one of our colleagues attended MJBizCon in Nevada and noted that “there is so much more to be done to bring this industry on par with other

The Supreme Court heard oral argument this week in not one, but two trademark cases with huge implications on commercial activity in the U.S. and abroad. The justices had a bit of fun—and even laughed at points when hypotheticals highlighted the absurdity of what consumers might encounter in today’s online marketplace—but at the end of

Melissa Viviane Jefferson, better known by her stage name Lizzo, popularized the phrase 100% THAT BITCH in her hit song “Truth Hurts.” But are popular song lyrics able to function as a trademark for a line of clothing?

Lizzo thought so as her trademark holding company, Lizzo LLC, filed several applications for the phrase 100%