The Supreme Court heard oral argument this week in not one, but two trademark cases with huge implications on commercial activity in the U.S. and abroad. The justices had a bit of fun—and even laughed at points when hypotheticals highlighted the absurdity of what consumers might encounter in today’s online marketplace—but at the end of

Melissa Viviane Jefferson, better known by her stage name Lizzo, popularized the phrase 100% THAT BITCH in her hit song “Truth Hurts.” But are popular song lyrics able to function as a trademark for a line of clothing?

Lizzo thought so as her trademark holding company, Lizzo LLC, filed several applications for the phrase 100%

The Super Bowl is one of the most highly anticipated events in the world of sports, attracting millions of fans, advertisers, and sponsors from around the globe. Because of this, Super Bowl advertisements are plentiful both before and during the game. However, keen observers may notice that, while some companies directly refer to the event

Seyfarth earned high rankings in the 2023 World Trademark Review 1000, with nine lawyers and four firm offices singled out.

Lauren Gregory Leipold (Atlanta) gained recognition for the first time joining longtime honorees Joan Larkin (Los Angeles), Bart Lazar (Chicago), Ed Maluf (New York), Lisa Meyerhoff (Houston), Brian Michaelis (Boston), Jay Myers (Atlanta), Julia

Trademark applicants encounter refusals from the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) based on a myriad of issues. Section 2(d) likelihood of confusion refusals and Section 2(e)(1) mere descriptiveness refusals or disclaimer requirements based on descriptiveness are often issued by the USPTO.

These refusals have applicants scratching their heads to determine whether to pursue an

Pursuant to the Trademark Modernization Act of 2020 (“TMA”), changes to certain procedural rules for ex parte trademark prosecution are now being implemented at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”). One of these changes concerns the amount of time applicants will have to respond to office actions, which Examining Attorneys periodically issue to address

The U.S. Supreme Court recently granted certiorari for two intellectual property cases—one relating to patents and another for trademarks.

Patent Case

Relevant to patent law, the Supreme Court granted certiorari to decide the issue of enablement for patents with so-called “genus claims.” Genus claims are directed to inventions that are functional in nature, and with

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) has received more than 170 petitions for expungement and reexamination since it began accepting these new filings late last year. And although the Office has issued guidance about how to prepare and submit a petition properly, it has reported a number of “common mistakes” that could easily be

Famed director Quentin Tarantino and production company Miramax settled their infringement lawsuit over non-fungible tokens (“NFTs”) before the US District Court for the Central District of California could weigh in on the merits of the claims, leaving us with far more questions than answers when it comes to the development of intellectual property law around