On Thursday, April 4, 2024, Seyfarth’s Los Angeles – Century City office hosted the INTA Roundtable Discussion on Cultural Competency and Working with Foreign Counsel.  Fellow trademark attorneys, IP paralegals, and law students gathered for a spirited discussion about what “cultural competence” means to them and how understanding and respecting different customs, cultures, and even

On Thursday, April 4, 2024 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Pacific, Seyfarth’s Los Angeles – Century City office will host the INTA Roundtable Discussion on Cultural Competency and Working with Foreign Counsel. This roundtable offers a unique opportunity to engage with seasoned experts, share insights, and explore best practices for fostering productive relationships with

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Warner Chappell Music, Inc. v. Nealy, an appeal of the Eleventh Circuit’s determination that a copyright plaintiff can recover damages for infringement occurring more than three years prior to filing suit. The Eleventh Circuit’s decision was based on the discovery accrual rule, which begins the limitations period at the moment a plaintiff becomes aware of or should reasonably learn of the infringement upon which a claim is based.

Sherman Nealy and Music Specialist, Inc. brought the underlying lawsuit against Warner and others based upon the alleged unauthorized licensing and use of songs owned by the plaintiffs. Much of alleged infringement occurred while Nealy was incarcerated, and he alleged that he did not become aware of the infringement until 2016. Nealy filed suit in 2018, within three years of the date he allegedly discovered the infringement.  The district court held that Nealy’s claims were timely, but that he could only obtain damages for the three years prior to the filing of his lawsuit. The Eleventh Circuit overturned the finding that such a limit on damages existed, holding that Nealy could potentially recover damages outside the three-year period.Continue Reading Skeptical of the Second Circuit: U.S. Supreme Court Hears Arguments on Copyright Damages

This blog has been cross-posted on Seyfarth’s California Peculiarities Employment Law blog.

Seyfarth Synopsis: Collaborations with athletes, actors, and singers have always been a great way for companies to grow their brand recognition and create profitable products. Similar to celebrity-filled ads in the Super Bowl, collaborative relationships between influencers and companies on social media

This post was originally published to Seyfarth’s International Dispute Resolution Blog.

There is a little-known provision of the Lanham Act (the US Trademark Act) that packs a potentially big punch. 15 USC § 1051(e) provides that if a non-U.S. entity registers for a trademark in the United States without designating a United States resident